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tuannyriver

Website & blog of Tuan Hoang, Pepperdine University

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Vietnamese diaspora

How many Vietnamese Catholic priests are there in the U.S.?

The short answer: There were about 900 Catholic priests of Vietnamese origin in the U.S. by 2012. There are approximately 950 at this time (2017), and probably more.

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Some participants in the fifth of a series called Emmaus, which are national gatherings among Vietnamese American priests. The 2013 gathering was held in Little Saigon, Orange County. ~ pc vietbao.com

Continue reading “How many Vietnamese Catholic priests are there in the U.S.?”

Catholic refugees, the age of priests, and money

“Do anything three times if possible,” goes my motto as a forty-something. Publish three books or articles on different topics but a common theme. Or, dance to three different songs but the same genre from the same period. Or, write three blog posts about the same subject matter in a row. Three books and articles I haven’t achieved.  But I’ve done the dancing bit and now I am doing the third thing.  My last two blog posts are about Vietnamese Catholic refugees in the U.S. during the 1970s and the 1980s, and this post rounds up the miniseries.

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Fr. Trần Văn Khoát and Catholic refugees in Beaumont and Port Arthur

My last post is about Ngô Đình Diệm’s older brother Archbishop Thục, who got mixed up with several reactionary groups during the 1970s and 1980s before reconciling with the Vatican and living out his last year among a religious order of Vietnamese men in Missouri.  Since then, I’ve read some more materials and learned about something I didn’t know before: a group of Catholic refugees led by a traditionalist and anti-Vatican II priest by the name of Trần Văn Khoát.
Continue reading “Fr. Trần Văn Khoát and Catholic refugees in Beaumont and Port Arthur”

The last years of Ngô Đình Thục

The only time that I’ve seen anyone related by blood to Ngô Đình Diệm – Ngo Dinh Diem for readers that are used to the English spelling – occurred exactly thirty-three years ago this month.  The town was Carthage, Missouri, best known as the American headquarters of a large Catholic order of Vietnamese American priests and brothers. The person was Ngô Đình Thục, Diệm’s older brother and the former archbishop of Huế. Along with tens of thousands of Vietnamese Catholics, I was attending the annual Marian Days weekend with my family and people from southern Minnesota. Unfortunately I don’t remember much about the Archbishop except that he presided over one of the masses with a visiting bishop from Vietnam.

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Buổi nói chuyện về người Việt tị nạn với dân biểu Stephanie Murphy

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Tác giả cùng dân biểu Murphy sau buổi nói chuyện, mặc áo có chữ R của Rollins College. Bên trái là cô Quỳnh Như của báo Trẻ Florida, bên phải là cô Vi Ma từ văn phòng thương mại người Mỹ gốc Á Châu tại miền trung Florida. ~ pc Nhu Nguyen

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Interviewing historians: Kurt Kinbacher on Vietnamese in Lincoln, Nebraska

Geographically speaking, there are two ways of viewing Vietnamese Americans in Lincoln, Nebraska.  One is to group them among Vietnamese in the Midwest.  It is a vast region that includes large communities such as Chicago and the Twin Cities, and smaller ones such as Cincinnati, Milwaukee, and Grand Rapids, MI.  Continue reading “Interviewing historians: Kurt Kinbacher on Vietnamese in Lincoln, Nebraska”

My article on reeducation camps and anticommunism

Click here for the introduction by Lan Chu; here for Mytoan Nguyen-Akbar’s article; and here for mine.

My last post is about a long history article on American Catholicism.  This post is about another long one: my own.  It is published in the Journal of Vietnamese Studies, and the entire issue should come out by the end of the month.

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Song of refugees #1 – Một Chút Quà Cho Quê Hương (A Few Gifts for the Homeland)

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Song of refugees #2 – 1954 Cha Bỏ Quê, 1975 Con Bỏ Nước (Father Left Home in 1954, Son Left Country in 1975)

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Haiphong 1954 ~ Northern Vietnamese leaving for the south ~ pc flick.com

Continue reading “Song of refugees #2 – 1954 Cha Bỏ Quê, 1975 Con Bỏ Nước (Father Left Home in 1954, Son Left Country in 1975)”

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