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tuannyriver

website & blog of Tuan Hoang, Pepperdine University

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Vietnamese diaspora

Fr. Trần Văn Khoát and Catholic refugees in Beaumont and Port Arthur

My last post is about Ngô Đình Diệm’s older brother Archbishop Thục, who got mixed up with several reactionary groups during the 1970s and 1980s before reconciling with the Vatican and living out his last year among a religious order of Vietnamese men in Missouri.  Since then, I’ve read some more materials and learned about something I didn’t know before: a group of Catholic refugees led by a traditionalist and anti-Vatican II priest by the name of Trần Văn Khoát.
Continue reading “Fr. Trần Văn Khoát and Catholic refugees in Beaumont and Port Arthur”

The last years of Ngô Đình Thục

The only time that I’ve seen anyone related by blood to Ngô Đình Diệm – Ngo Dinh Diem for readers that are used to the English spelling – occurred exactly thirty-three years ago this month.  The town was Carthage, Missouri, best known as the American headquarters of a large Catholic order of Vietnamese American priests and brothers. The person was Ngô Đình Thục, Diệm’s older brother and the former archbishop of Huế. Along with tens of thousands of Vietnamese Catholics, I was attending the annual Marian Days weekend with my family and people from southern Minnesota. Unfortunately I don’t remember much about the Archbishop except that he presided over one of the masses with a visiting bishop from Vietnam.

Continue reading “The last years of Ngô Đình Thục”

Buổi nói chuyện về người Việt tị nạn với dân biểu Stephanie Murphy

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Tác giả cùng dân biểu Murphy sau buổi nói chuyện, mặc áo có chữ R của Rollins College. Bên trái là cô Quỳnh Như của báo Trẻ Florida, bên phải là cô Vi Ma từ văn phòng thương mại người Mỹ gốc Á Châu tại miền trung Florida. ~ pc Nhu Nguyen

Continue reading “Buổi nói chuyện về người Việt tị nạn với dân biểu Stephanie Murphy”

Interviewing historians: Kurt Kinbacher on Vietnamese in Lincoln, Nebraska

Geographically speaking, there are two ways of viewing Vietnamese Americans in Lincoln, Nebraska.  One is to group them among Vietnamese in the Midwest.  It is a vast region that includes large communities such as Chicago and the Twin Cities, and smaller ones such as Cincinnati, Milwaukee, and Grand Rapids, MI.  Continue reading “Interviewing historians: Kurt Kinbacher on Vietnamese in Lincoln, Nebraska”

My article on reeducation camps and anticommunism

Click here for Lan Chu’s introduction.
Here for Mytoan Nguyen-Akbar’s article.
And here for my article. 

My last post is about a long history article on American Catholicism.  This post is about another long one: my own.  It is published in the Journal of Vietnamese Studies, and the entire issue should come out by the end of the month.

Continue reading “My article on reeducation camps and anticommunism”

Song of refugees #1 – Một Chút Quà Cho Quê Hương (A Few Gifts for the Homeland)

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Continue reading “Song of refugees #1 – Một Chút Quà Cho Quê Hương (A Few Gifts for the Homeland)”

Song of refugees #2 – 1954 Cha Bỏ Quê, 1975 Con Bỏ Nước (Father Left Home in 1954, Son Left Country in 1975)

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Haiphong 1954 ~ Northern Vietnamese leaving for the south ~ pc flick.com

Continue reading “Song of refugees #2 – 1954 Cha Bỏ Quê, 1975 Con Bỏ Nước (Father Left Home in 1954, Son Left Country in 1975)”

Song of refugees #3 – Ai Trở Về Xứ Việt (Who Are Returning to the Viet Land?)

This song is most interesting because the original lyrics were written in Paris by the writer Minh Đức Hoài Trinh: in 1962 or thirteen years before the Fall of Saigon.

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Minh Đức Hoài Trinh in Europe during the 1960s ~ pc minhduchoaitrinh.wordpress.com

Continue reading “Song of refugees #3 – Ai Trở Về Xứ Việt (Who Are Returning to the Viet Land?)”

Song of refugees #4 – Anh Vẫn Mơ Một Ngày Về (I Still Dream of Returning One Day)

Ask Vietnamese to name Vietnamese female singers that they love, and you can expect to hear many names.  Ask them to name a Vietnamese female songwriter, and just about everyone will be stumped by the question.  For there has been little recorded popular music written by Vietnamese women.  I have no explanation for the wide discrepancy.  But such was the case, at least in South Vietnam and the postwar diaspora.

Continue reading “Song of refugees #4 – Anh Vẫn Mơ Một Ngày Về (I Still Dream of Returning One Day)”

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